Woman with raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs) Woman with raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs)

Meet ESKATA.

Introducing the first and only FDA-approved topical treatment for raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs)

SEE THE
RESULTS
Not an actual patient.

Do you have raised SKs?

Raised SKs can show up in your
40s—or even in your 30s…

You didn’t choose to get raised SKs,
but you can choose to treat them.

Not an actual patient.

4 Key SK Questions

What are these spots on my face

1) What are these spots on my face?

SK spots can be flat* or raised with a color that is your normal skin tone or darker. Flat SKs have a velvety or shiny texture. Over time, they may get bigger and more may show up. They may also become thicker and raised with a waxy or rough texture. SKs can appear anywhere on your body, but are most common on the face (hairline/temples), neck, chest, and back.

*ESKATA treats raised SKs.

2) Are they harmful?

SKs are harmless spots that pop up as we age. While they may appear concerning, you shouldn’t worry if you have them. SKs are non-cancerous and generally don’t cause any pain or discomfort. SKs are the most common type of bumps seen in a doctor’s office; if you have any concerns, consult a dermatologist to see if your spots are SKs or something more serious.

Are seborrheic keratoses SKs harmful
Why did I get raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs)

3) Why did I get them?

Some possible risk factors include older age and genetics. However, it’s important to remember you’re not alone.

4) What is ESKATA?

ESKATA is the first and only FDA-approved topical treatment for raised SKs.

What is ESKATA

Meet ESKATA.

ESKATA is the first and only FDA-approved topical treatment that can treat raised SKs.

With its proprietary solution and soft-tip, pen-like applicator, dermatologists can target and treat raised SKs with ESKATA.

Not an actual patient.

How does ESKATA work?

For the first time, dermatologists have a topical option for treating raised SKs.

ESKATA soft-tip applicator pen
ESKATA soft-tip applicator pen

ESKATA should not be used on open or infected SKs, or on raised SKs that are close to the rim of the eyes.

Good to know:

ESKATA clinical studies

Clinical studies of ESKATA
included more than 900 patients

Paying for ESKATA

ESKATA is not covered by insurance.
It is a self-pay treatment

Results you can see

Don’t just take our word for it.

See for yourself.

In clinical studies, 18% of patients experienced clearance of 3 out of 4 of their raised SKs treated with ESKATA vs 0% with vehicle. Results were evaluated at Day 106 after initial treatment.

Before and after ESKATA
Before and after ESKATA

Before

After

After 2 treatments (Day 106)

Photos have not been retouched. Results may vary.

Is ESKATA right for you?

First things first

If the raised spots on your face or neck are concerning you, the first step is going to your dermatologist to see if they are SKs.

A skin condition like raised SKs doesn’t have to be “serious” to make you seek treatment. Dermatologists can help with many non-medical skin issues that have a big impact on the way you view yourself.

FIND A DOCTOR

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Ask your doctor about ESKATA

Talking to your doctor

Ready to talk to your doctor about starting ESKATA?

Your doctor may understand that your raised SKs are bothering you, but you’re an expert on how they affect your daily life. When talking to your dermatologist about ESKATA, use the questions and conversation-starters below to help guide your discussion.

Talk to your doctor about raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs)

Not an actual patient.

Diagnosing raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs)

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Feeling self-conscious about raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs) Feeling self-conscious about raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs)

Not an actual patient.

I don’t like the look of the raised spots on my face, neck, arms, or chest.

I heard about these things called SKs. Are SKs the spots I have?

Do I have raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs) Do I have raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs)

Not an actual patient.

Trying to hide raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs) Trying to hide raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs)

Not an actual patient.

I’ve tried makeup, topical, or over-the-counter treatments to hide my SKs.

I’m ready for a different, topical option to help treat my raised SKs.

Ready to treat raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs) Ready to treat raised seborrheic keratoses (SKs)

Not an actual patient.

Is ESKATA right for me Is ESKATA right for me

Not an actual patient.

Do you think ESKATA is a good option for my raised SKs?

ESKATA FAQs

Resources

ESKATA FAQs

A dermatologist will be able to tell you if the spots you have are raised SKs or not. You can use our Dermatologist Finder to locate a doctor near you.
Some risk factors include genetics and age.
SKs can show up anywhere on your body, but are most common on the face, neck, and hairline. They are also common on the chest and back. SKs do not appear on palms, soles of feet, or mucous membranes.
No, they naturally appear as we age.
ESKATA was developed exclusively to treat raised SKs. Its proprietary solution and soft-tip, pen-like applicator are used to target and treat each raised SK.
Price will vary depending on how many treatments of ESKATA you need. You can talk with your dermatologist about cost.
ESKATA is not covered by insurance.
Your healthcare provider will evaluate your results approximately 3 weeks after treatment with ESKATA. If your treated raised SKs are not clear, your healthcare provider may apply ESKATA once more, as long as the treatment area is not irritated. In clinical studies, results were evaluated at Day 106 after initial treatment.
ESKATA is likely to cause a stinging sensation at the time of application. The most common side effects include itching, stinging, crusting, swelling, redness, and scaling.
No, only a dermatologist, nurse, or other trained healthcare provider can apply ESKATA.
You can use our Dermatologist Finder to locate a doctor near you.
Clinical studies evaluated final treatment results at Day 106, but not the recurrence of SKs. Please consult with your dermatologist.

ESKATA can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Eye problems. Eye problems can happen if ESKATA gets into your eyes, including: ulcers or small holes in your eyes, scarring, redness, irritation, eyelid swelling, severe eye pain, and permanent eye injury, including blindness.
  • If ESKATA accidentally gets into your eyes, your healthcare provider will tell you to flush them well with water for 15 to 30 minutes. Your healthcare provider may send you to another healthcare provider if needed.
  • Local skin reactions. Skin reactions have happened in and around the treatment area after application of ESKATA. Severe skin reactions can include: breakdown of the outer layer of the skin (erosion), ulcers, blisters and scarring. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any skin reactions during treatment with ESKATA.

The most common side effects of ESKATA include: itching, stinging, crusting, swelling, redness and scaling.

Your healthcare provider will not apply another treatment of ESKATA if your treated area is still irritated from the previous treatment.

Tell your healthcare provider right away if ESKATA gets into your eyes, mouth or nose during application. ESKATA is for topical use on the skin only, and is not for use in your eyes, mouth or vagina.

These are not all the possible side effects of ESKATA.

Approved Use for ESKATA

ESKATA is a prescription medicine used to treat seborrheic keratoses that are raised.

ESKATA is for use as an in-office treatment. ESKATA is applied by your healthcare provider and is not for use at home.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Contact Aclaris Therapeutics, Inc. at 1-833-ACLARIS or 1-833-225-2747 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see ESKATA full Prescribing Information.